A children's trail focused on memory and place

John Prince Siddon, Walmajarri people, Western Australia, born Derby, Western Australia 1964, Mix it all up, 2019, Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 120.0 x 240.0 cm, Acquisition through Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art supported by BHP 2020 Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide © John Prince Siddon/Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency

John Prince Siddon, Walmajarri people, Western Australia, born 1964, Derby, Western Australia, Australia: Mix it all up, 2019, Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 120.0 x 240.0 cm; Acquisition through Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art supported by BHP 2020, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, © John Prince Siddon | Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency.

Dazzling Patterns

Travel downstairs where you will be greeted by the colourful work of John Prince Siddon. Identify any animals, people or objects you can recognise in Prince’s work. What things did your family and friends find that perhaps you didn’t notice?

Prince is described as having a signature style. How would you describe his ‘signature style’? List 5 words.


installation view: Tarnanthi 2021, featuring works by Minyma Kutjara artists, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; photo: Saul Steed.

Moving Mutaka

In 2017, artists from Irrunytju started collecting found objects to be used for their art making. Look closely at each mutaka (motor car). What recycled objects can you recognise?

Select your favourite mutaka. Write a story about the journey this vehicle is about to take. At home continue to be inspired by Tarnanthi and create your own egg carton vehicle that with transport you and your family or friends to a special destination. Be inspired by Minyma Kutjara Arts Project and see what other recycled objects you can find around the home to that might help your car move!


Teho Ropeyarn, Angkamuthi/Yadhaykana (Northern Cape York) people, Queensland, born Mount Isa, Queensland 1988, Ayarra (rainy season), 2021, Cairns, Queensland, vinyl‑cut print on paper, 150.0 x 230.0 cm © Teho Ropeyarn/Onespace Gallery, Brisbane

Ayarra (rainy season), 2021, Cairns, Queensland, vinyl-cut, ink on paper, 154.0 x 227.0 cm; Courtesy the artist and Teho Ropeyarn, © Teho Ropeyarn | Onespace Gallery, Brisbane, photo: Joe Ruckli.

Ayarra rainy season

Locate Teho Ropeyarn’s trio of large-scale works on paper on display in Gallery 24. These refer to the importance of water in Injinoo life. Injinoo is located at the very tip of Cape York in Queensland. Create a drawing that captures the weather conditions where you live.


Image: Maree Clarke, Yorta Yorta/Wamba Wamba/Mutti Mutti/ Boonwurrung people, Victoria/New South Wales; Melbourne, Victoria; Vivien Anderson Gallery.

Safe passage

Head upstairs to Gallery 10 and look at the over-sized necklaces by Maree Clarke. Traditionally necklaces made from river-reeds were given to people as a sign of safe passage and friendship. Draw a talisman for a friend or loved one. A talisman is an object that is thought to have special powers and will bring good luck.

At home, you might create your talisman from cardboard or other recycled materials. You may like to research how river reed necklaces were made a long time ago and how Clarke has continued this practice.


Alec Baker, Yankunytjatjara people, South Australia, born 1932, Shirley Well, South Australia, Ngura (Country), Kalaya Tjina (Emu Tracks), 2020, Indulkana, South Australia, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 67.0 x 91.0 cm; Courtesy the artist and Iwantja Arts, © Alec Baker | Iwantja arts.

Country & place

Kalaya Tjina (Emu Tracks) is a suite of sixteen paintings by Yankunytjatjara artist Alec Baker. Each of the paintings are called Ngura, which means Country, campsite or place. Country is important to Baker who says he likes to ‘paint everything that makes that place’. Create a drawing of a place that is special to you – make sure you include all the features that makes it special.


Yaritji Young, Pitjantjatjara people, South Australia, born Rocket Bore, South Australia 1956, Tjala tjukurpa – Honey ant story, 2021, Amata, South Australia, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 300.0 x 200.0 cm © Yaritji Young/Tjala Arts

Yaritji Young, Pitjantjatjara people, South Australia, born 1956, Rocket Bore, Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands, South Australia, Tjala tjukurpa - Honey ant story, 2021, Amata, South Australia, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 300.0 x 200.0 cm; Courtesy the artist and Tjala Arts, © Yaritji Young | Tjala Arts.

Colour and Country

Pitjantjatjara artist Yaritji Young is the traditional owner of Tjala Tjukurpa – Honey Ant creation story (Gallery 9). The twisted lines and shapes depict the tunnels and formations made by the tjala (honey ant). Young’s use of bright colours represent the flowers and sap found on Country. Which is your favourite colour in Young’s painting? Draw the tjala ants collecting honey from the flowers to give to the queen.