Bring the artists into the classroom

The 16 baskets made by Rarru, Ganalmirriwuy and Nalmakarra express their identity as members of the Liyagawumirr-Garrawurra clan as well as their connections to the Gorryindi, Mäḻarra and Gamalaŋga clans. Their Liyagawumirr-Garrawurra designs are limited to a palette of red, white and yellow and applied as stripes, circles and triangles. Their miṉḏirr adorned with these designs express their Liyagawumirr-Garrawurra identity, whereas other miṉḏirr with alternating colours running vertically through horizontal bands express their grandmother’s Gamalaŋga clan and the closely affiliated Mäḻarra and Gorryindi clans. Recently, Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu was granted permission by Rarru to create works using Rarru’s iconic black dying process, into which she has incorporated her own distinct coil technique. Imbued in all these bold designs is an intricate knowledge of Country, kinship and law.

Watch Helen Ganalmirriwuy_Gunga’puy Dhäwu as she shares the harvesting, preparing, dying and weaving process (Milingimbi Art and Culture)

Watch master weaver and colour dyer Laŋani Marika, the most senior elder of the Rirratjiŋu clan, impart her colour knowledge this video installation by The Mulka Project of Northeast Arnhem Land.

Why do you think it is important that the artists make their works together? What is the benefit of creating works of art in this way?

Other than making objects such as baskets and bags, what else might weaving be useful for?

The fibres the artists use to make their works are strongly connected to place and culture. Is there a plant or flower that is connected to your family or one you associate with a place you have a connection to?

Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu, Gupapuyŋu-Gaykamungu people, Northern Territory, born 1980, Gove, Northern Territory, Djirri-didi miṉḏirr (Garrawurra conical basket), Bidiyunawuy miṉḏirr (painted conical basket) and Djirri-didi miṉḏirr (Garrawurra conical basket), 2020, Yurrwi (Milingimbi), Northern Territory, pandanus, earth pigments, 28.5 x 12.5 cm (diam), 25.0 x 13.0 cm (diam), 16.0 x 21.0 cm (diam.); © Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu/Milingimbi Art and Culture, photo: Grant Hancock.

About the weavers

Learn more about the artists working at Milingimbi Art and Culture


Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu, Gupapuyŋu-Gaykamungu people, Northern Territory, born 1980, Gove, Northern Territory, Mol miṉḏirr (black conical basket) and Mol miṉḏirr (black conical basket), 2020, Yurrwi (Milingimbi), Northern Territory, pandanus, natural dyes, 15.0 x 20.5 cm (diam.), 32.0 x 17.0 cm (diam); © Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu/Milingimbi Art and Culture , photo: Grant Hancock.

Making & Responding

Experiment, invent, make and create

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